Pure Lucht
Leadership Lessons Learned by John Lucht

I think many leaders – especially those new to leadership roles – feel that they need to maintain a tight hold on their role as leader. They sometimes think that relinquishing leadership for a project or over a customer or client matter to someone else may indicate a lack of confidence, knowledge or even disinterest. In my experience, it is almost always quite the opposite.

It takes a tremendous amount of confidence (in another person and in one’s own “skin”) to be able to turn over leadership of something to a colleague. Why? Because 1) There is risk involved in failure. The person could fail to lead well, and the project could fail. This could put business relationships,...

A recent article in Accounting Today talked about “Bully Bosses.” This ties directly to my earlier post about leaders who are either bulldozers or tillers and applies to all businesses, not just accounting firms. The article’s author lists a series of questions for leaders to ask themselves to find out if they may be viewed as a bully leader.  For starters:

Do I…

1. See my employees look at their shoes when I ask for input?

...

As I thought about this topic, I did what I usually do when I need a kick-start for writing a post: I Googled it. My Google search term was “not everyone is a leader.” As you see from the screenshot below, that search brought up 111 million (yes, million) results. That told me two things. 1) The topic had been well covered and I was probably wasting my time; and 2) I found myself disagreeing with my own topic after I reviewed many of the articles I read.

[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"426","attributes":{"alt":"google image search results leadership","class":"media-image","height":"480","style":"float: left;","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"417"}}]]Here’s my perspective. At Smith & Howard, we have about 100 people. We have quite a few official leaders: leaders of departments, leaders of committees, and of...

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